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  1. #1
    Bright, David
    Guest

    Scanning hard-copies of documents for use in ATLAS


    Hello all:

    I have used ATLAS extensively to analyze pre-digitized material (in an
    electronic format that can be easily convert to a text file), but am
    interested in broadening my HU's so that I can include scanned hard-copies
    of documents and other materials. For example, I would love to use ATLAS to
    assist me while conducting literature reviews. It would be great to
    assemble several articles or book chapters as part of an HU, review and code
    them, then use ATLAS to rapidly retrieve key information while writing.
    While many articles published in the last six or seven years are available
    in electronic format, I (as most of you) have numerous hard copy documents
    in my files. In addition, I frequently gather news articles, magazine
    publications and other archival information about my field subjects--all of
    which is information that would be useful to include in an HU. Have any of
    you experimented with scanning technology to convert hard copy data for use
    in ATLAS?

    In the current form of the program, it seems like there are two ways to do
    this:
    1. Scan the hard-copy document and convert it to text by using OCR
    technology--say in Adobe Acrobat or something similar. The converted
    document is then attached to the HU as a Primary Document for textual data.

    2. Scan the hard-copy document and save it as an image file (such as .tif,
    .bmp, or .jpg). The converted file is then attached to the HU as a Primary
    Document for graphical data.


    There are several challenges to both approaches. In option number one,
    there is potential for numerous errors in the OCR conversion. In option
    number two, the graphical data approach would only allow for the use of one
    page at a time--thus, each page of an article would have to be a PD. This
    approach would also require an enormous amount of disk space. Both
    approaches are potentially time-consuming, particularly if a slow scanner is
    used.


    So, with this information as a backdrop, I actually have several questions:
    1. Have any of you tried to do what I am suggesting here?
    2. If so, what have you tried, and how has it worked for you? What scanner
    technology have you used? What software was helpfu you? etc.
    3. Are there any plans to make it possible to use .pdf files as Primary
    Documents? (This question is for Thomas and the other developers who moniter
    this list.)

    Thanks for indulging a lengthy question.

    Best regards,

    David Bright
    Department of Organizational Behavior
    Case Western Reserve University
    216-692-0966 (home office)
    216-368-2055 (school office)
    dxb83@po.cwru.edu

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    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>Hello all:</FONT>
    </P>

    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>I have used ATLAS extensively to analyze pre-digitized material (in an</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>electronic format that can be easily convert to a text file), but am</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>interested in broadening my HU's so that I can include scanned hard-copies</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>of documents and other materials.  For example, I would love to use ATLAS to</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>assist me while conducting literature reviews.  It would be great to</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>assemble several articles or book chapters as part of an HU, review and code</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>them, then use ATLAS to rapidly retrieve key information while writing.</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>While many articles published in the last six or seven years are available</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>in electronic format, I (as most of you) have numerous hard copy documents</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>in my files.  In addition, I frequently gather news articles, magazine</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>publications and other archival information about my field subjects--all of</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>which is information that would be useful to include in an HU.  Have any of</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>you experimented with scanning technology to convert hard copy data for use</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>in ATLAS?</FONT>
    </P>

    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>In the current form of the program, it seems like there are two ways to do</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>this:</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>1.  Scan the hard-copy document and convert it to text by using OCR</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>technology--say in Adobe Acrobat or something similar.   The converted</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>document is then attached to the HU as a Primary Document for textual data.</FONT>
    </P>

    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>2.  Scan the hard-copy document and save it as an image file (such as .tif,</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>.bmp, or .jpg).  The converted file is then attached to the HU as a Primary</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Document for graphical data.</FONT>
    </P>
    <BR>

    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>There are several challenges to both approaches.  In option number one,</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>there is potential for numerous errors in the OCR conversion.  In option</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>number two, the graphical data approach would only allow for the use of one</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>page at a time--thus, each page of an article would have to be a PD.  This</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>approach would also require an enormous amount of disk space.  Both</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>approaches are potentially time-consuming, particularly if a slow scanner is</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>used.</FONT>
    </P>
    <BR>

    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>So, with this information as a backdrop, I actually have several questions:</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>1.  Have any of you tried to do what I am suggesting here?</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>2.  If so, what have you tried, and how has it worked for you?  What scanner</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>technology have you used?  What software was helpfu you?  etc.</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>3.  Are there any plans to make it possible to use .pdf files as Primary</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Documents? (This question is for Thomas and the other developers who moniter</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>this list.)</FONT>
    </P>

    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>Thanks for indulging a lengthy question.</FONT>
    </P>

    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>Best regards,</FONT>
    </P>

    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>David Bright</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Department of Organizational Behavior</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Case Western Reserve University</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>216-692-0966 (home office)</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>216-368-2055 (school office)</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>dxb83@po.cwru.edu</FONT>
    </P>

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  2. #2
    Daly, Jeanette
    Guest

    Scanning hard-copies of documents for use in ATLAS


    I have scanned law statutes and then converted them to text only with lines.
    Then loaded them into Atlas. It works well.
    Jeanette

    Jeanette Daly, RN, PhD
    Department of Family Medicine
    University of Iowa
    01105-C PFP
    200 Hawkins Drive
    Iowa City, Iowa 52242
    jeanette-daly@uiowa.edu
    Telephone: 319-384-8995
    Fax: 319-384-7822


    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: Bright, David [SMTP:dxb83@WEATHERHEAD.CWRU.EDU]
    > Sent: Monday, June 11, 2001 12:00 PM
    > To: ATLAS-TI@LISTSERV.GMD.DE
    > <subject>Scanning hard-copies of documents for use in ATLAS</subject>
    >
    > Hello all:
    >
    > I have used ATLAS extensively to analyze pre-digitized material (in an
    > electronic format that can be easily convert to a text file), but am
    > interested in broadening my HU's so that I can include scanned hard-copies
    >
    > of documents and other materials. For example, I would love to use ATLAS
    > to
    > assist me while conducting literature reviews. It would be great to
    > assemble several articles or book chapters as part of an HU, review and
    > code
    > them, then use ATLAS to rapidly retrieve key information while writing.
    > While many articles published in the last six or seven years are available
    >
    > in electronic format, I (as most of you) have numerous hard copy documents
    >
    > in my files. In addition, I frequently gather news articles, magazine
    > publications and other archival information about my field subjects--all
    > of
    > which is information that would be useful to include in an HU. Have any
    > of
    > you experimented with scanning technology to convert hard copy data for
    > use
    > in ATLAS?
    >
    > In the current form of the program, it seems like there are two ways to do
    >
    > this:
    > 1. Scan the hard-copy document and convert it to text by using OCR
    > technology--say in Adobe Acrobat or something similar. The converted
    > document is then attached to the HU as a Primary Document for textual
    > data.
    >
    > 2. Scan the hard-copy document and save it as an image file (such as
    > .tif,
    > .bmp, or .jpg). The converted file is then attached to the HU as a
    > Primary
    > Document for graphical data.
    >
    >
    > There are several challenges to both approaches. In option number one,
    > there is potential for numerous errors in the OCR conversion. In option
    > number two, the graphical data approach would only allow for the use of
    > one
    > page at a time--thus, each page of an article would have to be a PD. This
    >
    > approach would also require an enormous amount of disk space. Both
    > approaches are potentially time-consuming, particularly if a slow scanner
    > is
    > used.
    >
    >
    > So, with this information as a backdrop, I actually have several
    > questions:
    > 1. Have any of you tried to do what I am suggesting here?
    > 2. If so, what have you tried, and how has it worked for you? What
    > scanner
    > technology have you used? What software was helpfu you? etc.
    > 3. Are there any plans to make it possible to use .pdf files as Primary
    > Documents? (This question is for Thomas and the other developers who
    > moniter
    > this list.)
    >
    > Thanks for indulging a lengthy question.
    >
    > Best regards,
    >
    > David Bright
    > Department of Organizational Behavior
    > Case Western Reserve University
    > 216-692-0966 (home office)
    > 216-368-2055 (school office)
    > dxb83@po.cwru.edu
    >



  3. #3
    JBBS
    Guest

    Scanning hard-copies of documents for use in ATLAS



    Dear list,

    Some comments to the post of David Bright

    El lunes, 11 de junio de 2001 a las 12:59:34 -0400 escribio ["Bright,
    David" <dxb83@WEATHERHEAD.CWRU.EDU>]:

    >In the current form of the program, it seems like there are two ways to do
    >this:
    >1. Scan the hard-copy document and convert it to text by using OCR
    >technology--say in Adobe Acrobat or something similar. The converted
    >document is then attached to the HU as a Primary Document for textual data.

    In the actual form of Atlas.ti, the textual data have to be stored as
    plain text file.

    >2. Scan the hard-copy document and save it as an image file (such as .tif,
    >.bmp, or .jpg). The converted file is then attached to the HU as a Primary
    >Document for graphical data.

    >There are several challenges to both approaches. In option number one,
    >there is potential for numerous errors in the OCR conversion. In option
    >number two, the graphical data approach would only allow for the use of one
    >page at a time--thus, each page of an article would have to be a PD. This
    >approach would also require an enormous amount of disk space. Both
    >approaches are potentially time-consuming, particularly if a slow scanner is
    >used.

    Solution 1: my experience with OCR is that recognizion from printed
    text is very accurate and fast (compared to typing). In addition, you
    will have the full text as a file which is readable (and searchable)
    by your computer. For example, Atlas will be able to make automatic
    coding (by matching text chains).

    Solution 2: It may be OK if graphical appearance is relevant for you
    and you do not need your transcribed documents in their fullness. This
    solution will be easy if your documents fit well to the size and shape
    allowed for graphical DP's in Atlas.ti and they remain readable!
    Otherwise, you may have to split them in several files and it can be a
    bit more complicate. Unfortunately Atlas.ti has in the moment no
    option to resize/zoom graphical documents.

    Of course, you can use mixed solutions. There is OCR which will allow
    you to store your documents both in textual and graphical files (for
    example ansi text and tiff files). You could even use both (textual
    and graphical form) if they both are of your interest in a given
    document/page, for example associating a text citation (textual PD) to
    its graphical context (graphical PD).

    Regarding scanners and OCR softwre, I think that there are many
    affordable solutions. I have used several scanners and as OCR software
    Caere Omnipage with very good results.

    All the best,
    Benito Bermejo

    Madrid, Spain



  4. #4
    Allison Tom
    Guest

    Scanning hard-copies of documents for use in ATLAS


    Re Scanning.

    Another option is to use a scanning pen (maybe not instead of a flatbed
    scanner but as a different strategy at different times) - I use a product
    called QuickLink. It allows me to scan printed matter in one line at a
    time so I get the "selecting and entering excerpts" learning experience,
    but without the typing. It works more or less like a highlighter, scanning
    whatever is under it directly into either the Pen (portable - less
    accurate, in my experience; but it does mean you can take notes in the
    library and download them to your computer) or you can use the pen to scan
    straight into the computer. I prefer this as it allows me to correct
    scanning errors as I go.

    Allison



    At 11:38 AM 6/12/01 -0400, David Smilde wrote:
    > >There are several challenges to both approaches. In option number one,
    > >there is potential for numerous errors in the OCR conversion. In option
    > >number two, the graphical data approach would only allow for the use of one
    > >page at a time--thus, each page of an article would have to be a PD. This
    > >approach would also require an enormous amount of disk space. Both
    > >approaches are potentially time-consuming, particularly if a slow scanner
    >is
    > >used.
    >
    >Solution 1: my experience with OCR is that recognizion from printed
    >text is very accurate and fast (compared to typing). In addition, you
    >will have the full text as a file which is readable (and searchable)
    >by your computer. For example, Atlas will be able to make automatic
    >coding (by matching text chains).
    >
    >Thanks for this, Benito. Is recognition generally good for older texts as
    >well? say, for example, a 1950s journal article, or books with unusual
    >fonts? Whenever possible, I work through relevant literatures by excerpting
    >quotes from interesting articles and books and then coding and commenting
    >them in Atlas. It would be great to be able to simply scan texts instead of
    >typing in excerpts (although the selection and typing is part of the
    >learning process). Thanks, DS
    >
    >************************************************* **************
    >David Smilde
    >Caracas, Venezuela
    >URL: http://www.arches.uga.edu/dsmilde/



  5. #5
    David Smilde
    Guest

    Scanning hard-copies of documents for use in ATLAS



    >There are several challenges to both approaches. In option number one,
    >there is potential for numerous errors in the OCR conversion. In option
    >number two, the graphical data approach would only allow for the use of one
    >page at a time--thus, each page of an article would have to be a PD. This
    >approach would also require an enormous amount of disk space. Both
    >approaches are potentially time-consuming, particularly if a slow scanner
    is
    >used.

    Solution 1: my experience with OCR is that recognizion from printed
    text is very accurate and fast (compared to typing). In addition, you
    will have the full text as a file which is readable (and searchable)
    by your computer. For example, Atlas will be able to make automatic
    coding (by matching text chains).

    Thanks for this, Benito. Is recognition generally good for older texts as
    well? say, for example, a 1950s journal article, or books with unusual
    fonts? Whenever possible, I work through relevant literatures by excerpting
    quotes from interesting articles and books and then coding and commenting
    them in Atlas. It would be great to be able to simply scan texts instead of
    typing in excerpts (although the selection and typing is part of the
    learning process). Thanks, DS

    ************************************************** *************
    David Smilde
    Caracas, Venezuela
    URL: http://www.arches.uga.edu/dsmilde/



  6. #6
    Bright, David
    Guest

    Scanning hard-copies of documents for use in ATLAS


    Allison,

    This is a great tip. Is there a link that we could to find information
    about this product? Do you have to link it to a laptop while you work, or
    does it store data independently for later uploading?

    David


    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Allison Tom <allison.tom@UBC.CA>
    To: <ATLAS-TI@LISTSERV.GMD.DE>
    Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2001 12:15 PM
    Subject: Re: Scanning hard-copies of documents for use in ATLAS


    > Re Scanning.
    >
    > Another option is to use a scanning pen (maybe not instead of a flatbed
    > scanner but as a different strategy at different times) - I use a product
    > called QuickLink. It allows me to scan printed matter in one line at a
    > time so I get the "selecting and entering excerpts" learning experience,
    > but without the typing. It works more or less like a highlighter,
    scanning
    > whatever is under it directly into either the Pen (portable - less
    > accurate, in my experience; but it does mean you can take notes in the
    > library and download them to your computer) or you can use the pen to
    scan
    > straight into the computer. I prefer this as it allows me to correct
    > scanning errors as I go.
    >
    > Allison
    >
    >
    >
    > At 11:38 AM 6/12/01 -0400, David Smilde wrote:
    > > >There are several challenges to both approaches. In option number one,
    > > >there is potential for numerous errors in the OCR conversion. In
    option
    > > >number two, the graphical data approach would only allow for the use of
    one
    > > >page at a time--thus, each page of an article would have to be a PD.
    This
    > > >approach would also require an enormous amount of disk space. Both
    > > >approaches are potentially time-consuming, particularly if a slow
    scanner
    > >is
    > > >used.
    > >
    > >Solution 1: my experience with OCR is that recognizion from printed
    > >text is very accurate and fast (compared to typing). In addition, you
    > >will have the full text as a file which is readable (and searchable)
    > >by your computer. For example, Atlas will be able to make automatic
    > >coding (by matching text chains).
    > >
    > >Thanks for this, Benito. Is recognition generally good for older texts as
    > >well? say, for example, a 1950s journal article, or books with unusual
    > >fonts? Whenever possible, I work through relevant literatures by
    excerpting
    > >quotes from interesting articles and books and then coding and commenting
    > >them in Atlas. It would be great to be able to simply scan texts instead
    of
    > >typing in excerpts (although the selection and typing is part of the
    > >learning process). Thanks, DS
    > >
    > >************************************************* **************
    > >David Smilde
    > >Caracas, Venezuela
    > >URL: http://www.arches.uga.edu/dsmilde/
    >

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    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>Allison,</FONT>
    </P>

    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>This is a great tip.  Is there a link that we could to find information</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>about this product?  Do you have to link it to a laptop while you work, or</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>does it store data independently for later uploading?</FONT>
    </P>

    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>David</FONT>
    </P>
    <BR>

    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>----- Original Message -----</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>From: Allison Tom <allison.tom@UBC.CA></FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>To: <ATLAS-TI@LISTSERV.GMD.DE></FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2001 12:15 PM</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Subject: Re: Scanning hard-copies of documents for use in ATLAS</FONT>
    </P>
    <BR>

    <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>> Re Scanning.</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>></FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> Another option is to use a scanning pen (maybe not instead of a flatbed</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> scanner but as a different strategy at different times) - I use a product</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> called QuickLink.  It allows me to scan printed matter in one line at a</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> time so I get the "selecting and entering excerpts" learning experience,</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> but without the typing.  It works more or less like a highlighter,</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>scanning</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> whatever is under it directly into either the Pen (portable - less</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> accurate, in my experience; but it does mean you can take notes in the</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> library and download them to your computer)  or you can use the pen to</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>scan</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> straight into the computer.  I prefer this as it allows me to correct</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> scanning errors as I go.</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>></FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> Allison</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>></FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>></FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>></FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> At 11:38 AM 6/12/01 -0400, David Smilde wrote:</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> > >There are several challenges to both approaches.  In option number one,</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> > >there is potential for numerous errors in the OCR conversion.  In</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>option</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> > >number two, the graphical data approach would only allow for the use of</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>one</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> > >page at a time--thus, each page of an article would have to be a PD.</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>This</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> > >approach would also require an enormous amount of disk space.  Both</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> > >approaches are potentially time-consuming, particularly if a slow</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>scanner</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >is</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> > >used.</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> ></FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >Solution 1: my experience with OCR is that recognizion from printed</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >text is very accurate and fast (compared to typing). In addition, you</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >will have the full text as a file which is readable (and searchable)</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >by your computer. For example, Atlas will be able to make automatic</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >coding (by matching text chains).</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> ></FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >Thanks for this, Benito. Is recognition generally good for older texts as</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >well? say, for example, a 1950s journal article, or books with unusual</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >fonts?  Whenever possible, I work through relevant literatures by</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>excerpting</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >quotes from interesting articles and books and then coding and commenting</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >them in Atlas. It would be great to be able to simply scan texts instead</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>of</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >typing in excerpts (although the selection and typing is part of the</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >learning process). Thanks, DS</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> ></FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >****************************************** *********************</FON=
    T>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >David Smilde</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >Caracas, Venezuela</FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>> >URL: <A HREF=3D"http://www.arches.uga.edu/dsmilde/" TARGET=3D"_blank">http://www.arches.uga.edu/dsmilde/</A></FONT>
    <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>></FONT>
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  7. #7
    Zakik Murillo Sencial
    Guest

    Scanning hard-copies of documents for use in ATLAS



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    <CENTER></CENTER>
    <CENTER><IMG border=3D0 height=3D292
    src=3D"http://globalgenealogy.com/images/001pic2.jpg" width=3D450> <FONT
    face=3DVerdana size=3D5><B>QuickLink Pen<FONT
    size=3D2><SUP>TM</SUP></FONT></B></FONT><BR><FONT color=3Dmaroon
    size=3D-1><B><I>(Capture printed text with the stroke of a
    pen!)</I></B></FONT><BR><BR></CENTER><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><A
    name=3Dsummary></A><BR><FONT color=3Dmaroon><FONT size=3D+1><B>PRODUCT
    SUMMARY</B></FONT></FONT><BR><BR>Capture printed text with the stroke of a
    pen... as fast and easy as using a highlighter. <B><I>Stores up to 1000
    pages of text</I></B>, so space is never an issue!<BR><BR>QuickLink Pen is
    light and fits neatly in oyur pocket so that you have the freedom to
    collect information anytime.... anywhere!<BR><BR><B>The QuickLink Pen
    Solution</B><BR>Fast and easy to use! Auto detects text for instant
    scanning. Just roll and read. Anyone can do it.<BR><BR>Transfers data
    directly into Windows applications such as Word, Outlook, Excel, Explorer.
    Software and patch-cord are included for attachment to your PC for
    downloads. Choose transcriptions or quotes to add to your family tree
    softwarre file. The friendly icon based graphical interface makes
    QuickLink Pen fun and intuitive!<BR><BR>Can be used equally easily by
    right-handed and left-handed people. Compact ergonomic design and simple
    controls make scanning, storing, managing and transeffing data
    effortless.<BR><BR>Fully expandable. Take advantage of hardware upgrades
    as they become available. <BR><BR><FONT color=3Dmaroon><B><FONT size=3D+1>So
    Many Uses</FONT></B></FONT><BR><BR><B>Digital Text
    Scanner</B><BR><BR>Simply swipe text from newspaper articles, books,
    magazines for transfer into your family history file, business documents
    or personal correspondence - all without typing.<BR><BR><B>Address
    Book</B><BR><BR>Scan business cards directly into your address book in
    Microsoft Outlook, insert email addresses into your address book, or use
    the QuickLink Pen as your own address book.<BR><BR><B>Internet
    links</B><BR><BR>Collect Internet addresses (URLs) and transfer them
    directly to your internet browser or Bookmarks/Faavorites - quickly,
    accurately and reliably.<BR><BR><B>Table Builder</B><BR><BR>Transfer
    printed tables (stock quotes, international monetary exchange, airlin or
    train schedules) and charts full of data, directly into your
    spreadsheet.<BR><BR><B>Language Tool</B><BR><BR>QuickLink Pen recognizes
    eight languages (English(US), English(UK), French, German, Italian,
    Portuguese, Spanish, and Swedish) and has the ability to translate into
    any of twenty four languages with an available upgrade (from the
    manufacturer)<BR><BR><FONT color=3Dmaroon><B><FONT size=3D+1>Package
    Contains:</FONT></B></FONT><BR><BR>
    <UL>
    <LI type=3D1>QuickLink Pen<BR><BR>
    <LI type=3D1>Carrying Case<BR><BR>
    <LI type=3D1>QuickLink Interface Software CD and tutorial video<BR><BR>
    <LI type=3D1>Operation manual<BR><BR>
    <LI type=3D1>Quick reference card<BR><BR>
    <LI type=3D1>Opticard<BR><BR>
    <LI type=3D1>QuickLink PC communication cable
    <LI type=3D1>2 AAA batteries
    <LI type=3D1>Free Ligature CharacterEyes OCR Software (limited version)
    </LI></UL><FONT color=3Dmaroon><B><FONT size=3D+1>Desktop Applications
    included:</FONT></B></FONT><BR><BR>
    <UL>
    <LI type=3D1>Features a business card reader, Table Builder, Websire URl
    Collector, Data and Notes Collector with the same, familiar icons as the
    QuickLink Pen, so users can store edit and transfer text for easy data
    management.<BR><BR>
    <LI type=3D1>Synchronizes and transfers data between the QuickLink Pen and
    desktop applications in seconds.<BR><BR></LI></UL><FONT
    color=3Dmaroon><B><FONT size=3D+1>Technical
    Specifications</FONT></B></FONT><BR><BR>
    <UL>
    <LI type=3D1>Size: 6" X 1 1/2" X 1"<BR><BR>
    <LI type=3D1>Weight: 3 Ounces.<BR><BR>
    <LI type=3D1>Batteries: 2 AAA (included)<BR><BR>
    <LI type=3D1>Serial Commnications: IRDA and RS232 via cable (included)
    <LI type=3D1>2 MB ROM Memory
    <LI type=3D1>2 MB integrated Flash memory
    <LI type=3D1>Socket for 4 MB Flash memory chip (upgrade option)
    </LI></UL><FONT color=3Dmaroon><B><FONT size=3D+1>System
    Requirements</FONT></B></FONT><BR><BR>
    <UL>
    <LI type=3D1>Windows 95, 98 or Windows NT or better<BR><BR>
    <LI type=3D1>CD ROM drive<BR><BR>
    <LI type=3D1>16 MB RAM or better<BR><BR><IMG align=3Dright alt=3D"" border=3D0
    height=3D91 src=3D"http://globalgenealogy.com/images/001pen.jpg" width=3D160>
    <LI type=3D1>8 MB hard disk
    <LI type=3D1>Also compatible with Palm Pilot, PDA's and Palm Computers.
    New generation text enabled, infared (IRDA-capable) cellular phones.
    </LI></UL></FONT></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></FONT></DIV></BODY></H=
    TML>




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